School leaders

thumb 244Source : TESSA

Thesis by Eric Addae-Kyeremeh BA (Hons) MA MEd, The Open University Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology, Doctorate in Education (Leadership and Management) :

Professional development spaces- An exploratory study of headteachers perspectives in Ghana (Abstract, see below)
Sub-theme: Total Teacher Professional Development

Abstract


Leadership learning is a fascinating area of research and for that matter headteachers learning and development. Headteachers in Ghana like many other countries spend their daily duties focussing on the learning of others with little attention to their own learning and development and the potential benefits for them and their school as a whole. In the last decade or so, Ghana has invested in the training and development of basic school teachers (including headteachers) through state resources and financial resources secured from DFID and other multi-national organisations (Education Sector Performance Report, 2013). These funds have been disbursed to municipal and district directorates through the decentralisation programme by the Ghana Education Service yet little is known about the impact of professional development activities.

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This resource is an adaptation of a TESS-India OER : The elementary school leader as enabler, page 4

 

Qualities of a good leader (adapted from Gardner, 1997).

 

To find out, click on "Lire la suite..."

thumb 224Source: TESS-India

This School Leadership OER (Open Educational Resource) is one of a set of 20 units from TESS-India designed to help school leaders develop their understanding and skills so that they can lead improvements in teaching and learning in their school.The units are essentially practical, with activities to be carried out in school with staff, students and others. They are based on research and academic study of effective schools. These resources are under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike licence and can be adapted to the contexts and needs of Sub Saharan African countries.

What this unit is about

There have been many changes in education policy in India in recent years, but one of the most significant is the shift in expectations on schools. The aspiration is that schools should become more autonomous and responsive to their local communities, and that school leaders should take greater responsibility for the quality of teaching and learning in their schools (Tyagi, 2011).The aim of the TESS-India Open Educational Resources (OERs) is to support school leaders that want to enable their schools to become dynamic learning environments with active students and interactive teachers. It can be a challenging task to bring about such practice where it does not already exist, although school leaders have a great deal of authority within their own school. This unit positions the school leader as an enabler – someone who uses their role to make things happen in their school. The TESS-India OERs provide a ‘toolkit’ to support you in this role. This first orientation unit aims to familiarise you in how to use the TESS-India School Leadership OERs for your own development. At the core of all these resources is the idea that learning is lifelong and continuous: for teachers to learn effectively, their school leaders also need to be learners.

thumb 224TESS-India aims to improve the classroom practices of elementary and secondary teachers in India through the provision of OERs to support school leaders and teachers in developing student-centred, participatory approaches.
The 105 TESS-India subject OERs provide teachers with a companion to the school textbook in the subjects of language, science and maths. They offer activities for teachers to try out in their classrooms with their students, together with case studies showing how other teachers have taught the topic and linked resources to support teachers in developing their lesson plans and subject knowledge.

All TESS-India OERs have been collaboratively written by Indian and international authors to address Indian curriculum and contexts, and are available for online and print use. The OERs are available in several versions, appropriate for each participating Indian state and users are invited to adapt and localise the OERs further to meet local needs and contexts. These resources can easily been adapted to Sub Saharan African countries.

These resources are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike licence.

TESS-India is led by The Open University UK.

 

 

Aprelia PartaTessaSource : Aprélia

The booklet Accompanying teachers: coaching and mentoring is a free educational resource (OER) developed by a group of teacher educators to support school leaders who accompany their staff’s Professional Learning and Development (LPD) within their institution with a view of enhancing the conditions and quality of learning in the school.

 It is an adaptation of the Aprélia booklet Accompagner les enseignant.e.s : coaching and mentorat which is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike licence. It also draws on the work carried out by TESSA and Aprélia in French-speaking Sub-Saharan Africa, separately or jointly, as well as the resources resulting from this work.It belongs to a collection of booklets that relates to the key issue of improving learning through school-based professional co-development.

What this booklet is about

Most of us have at some point in our lives benefited from the generosity of a friend or family member who has listened to us as we have struggled to come to terms with a challenge or a problem.
In a professional context, such support and guidance is often referred to as coaching or mentoring, and in this booklet you will learn to distinguish between these two approaches. You will understand some of the skills and techniques associated with coaching and mentoring, and how to use them in your conversations with teachers, students and their parents and/or guardians.

Aprelia PartaTessaSource : Aprélia

The booklet Leading teachers’ professional development is a free educational resource (OER) developed by a group of teacher educators to support school leaders who accompany their staff’s Professional Learning and Development (LPD) within their institution with a view of enhancing the conditions and quality of learning in the school.

It is an adaptation of the Aprélia booklet Conduire le développement professionnel continu des enseignants which is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike licence. It also draws on the work carried out by TESSA and Aprélia in French-speaking Sub-Saharan Africa, separately or jointly, as well as the resources resulting from this work.It belongs to a collection of booklets that relates to the key issue of improving learning through school-based professional co-development.

What this booklet is about

As a school leader your leadership role implicitly includes providing support to teachers to enable them improve their practice (including leading teacher professional development). This is not straightforward because there are certain constraints (including budgets) that are not within your control. However, there are opportunities for you to maximise teachers’ effectiveness through school-based support strategies, which is the focus of this booklet.

Aprelia PartaTessaSource : Aprélia

The booklet Supporting teachers to raise performance is a free educational resource (OER) developed by a group of teacher educators to support school leaders who accompany their staff’s Professional Learning and Development (LPD) within their institution with a view of enhancing the conditions and quality of learning in the school.


It is an adaptation of the Aprélia booklet Soutenir les enseignants pour améliorer les apprentissages which is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike licence. It also draws on the work carried out by TESSA and Aprélia in French-speaking Sub-Saharan Africa, separately or jointly, as well as the resources resulting from this work.It belongs to a collection of booklets that relates to the key issue of improving learning through school-based professional co-development.

What this booklet is about

In an ideal world, all students would achieve good learning gains each year in school, helped by teachers who knew about the latest learning theories and how to apply these to each individual student’s needs. The teachers would be able to do this with the resources provided by the school and despite whatever else was happening elsewhere in their lives.
However, we do not live in an ideal world. Teachers are human beings who sometimes find themselves working not at their best. If they are aware of this, they may only need a small amount of support to improve –but the problem is when the teacher does not realise they can do better and student learning is suffering. This is a sensitive issue that needs careful handling, but is part of the role and responsibility of a good school leader.
In this booklet you will learn how to gather evidence about teacher performance and explore some ideas to improve it by using planning supportive development activities. Your teachers are the biggest determinant of student achievement and therefore your influence in promoting teacher performance will directly impact on student learning and outcomes.

thumb 216Source : SAIDE

In 2017, Saide was awarded the tender by the South African Department of Basic Education (DBE) to develop the practice-based, learning programme course materials for the Advanced Diploma in School Leadership and Management.

Saide’s Maryla Bialobrzeska reports on the overall approach that informed the design and the development of the programme course materials and provides a brief overview of the planned implementation process.

The Advanced Diploma in School Leadership and Management (represents a new and exciting national initiative in the professional development of practising and aspirant school principals.

logo 1951Source : Apréli@

In addition to the booklet Leading the school development plan, three new booklets are henceforth available :

Transforming teaching-learning process :

  • Leading teachers’ professional development
  • Supporting teachers to raise performance
  • Accompanying teachers : coaching and mentoring.

See on Apréli@ website

See also : From India to Sub Saharan Africa: supporting school leaders in transforming their schools into Extended Professional Learning Community (EPLC)

logo projet etablissementSource : Apréli@

The PartaTESSA-Apréli@ booklet Leading the School Development Plan is a free educational resource (OER) developed by a group of teacher educators to support school leaders who accompany their staff’s Professional Learning and Development (LPD) within their institution with a view of enhancing the conditions and quality of learning in the school. It also draws on the work carried out by TESSA and Apréli@ in French-speaking Sub-Saharan Africa, separately or jointly, as well as the resources resulting from this work.

See on Apréli@ website

See also : From India to Sub Saharan Africa: supporting school leaders in transforming their schools into Extended Professional Learning Community (EPLC)

 

TESS INDIA LogoSource : TESS-India

The TESS-India School Leadership OER are designed to help school leaders develop their understanding and skills to improve the teaching and learning in their school. The OER are practical and include activities and reflections that should be carried out in school with staff, students and others. They are based on research and academic study of effective schools.

There is no prescribed order for studying the OER, but The elementary school leader as enabler or The secondary school leader as enabler (depending on which level of school you are a leader of) are the best place to start, as they provide background and orientation for the whole set. You will also find the OER on Leading improvements in teaching and learning in the elementary (or secondary) school provide an excellent guide as to how to introduce and use the teacher OER in your school to enable more student centred, participative practice.

thumb 155Source : Apréli@-PartaTESSA booklet for school heads School LeadershipTransforming teaching-learning process: leading the use of ICTs in your school, pages 11-12. It is part of a set of five booklets for school leaders.

Case Study 2: Using a laptop and a projector

English teacher, Mr Pepple, explains how he uses his laptop in school and gets access to the internet to download resources and information :

"My laptop is my most treasured possession! I use it all the time. I can connect to the internet at my friend’s house and download materials that I can use in school. Sometimes when there are connection problems I go to a hotel in the town centre and pay for internet access for an hour.

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This site offers classes as well as an outlet for school leaders to communicate, share ideas, and get feedback. Its general advice remains consistent:
  • Be calm and pause. School is not the most important thing right now; safety is.
  • Be straightforward and clear. People have heightened anxiety and cannot process information as effectively.
  • Create simple solutions. Simplify as much as you can.
Click here

 

logo 1951Source : Apréli@

TESSA newsletter, February 2018, by Michèle Deane, TESSA, and Geneviève Puiségur-Pouchin, editor of Apréli@ collection for school leaders (extract) :

"The school has an increasing importance as the locus of professional development for teachers. School-based CDP can focus directly on teaching practices and the practicalities of improving the quality of teaching. … However, leadership is critically important for this kind of school-based teacher education.” (Cullen et al, 2012)

“The role of school principals is crucial for establishing, shaping and fostering instructional quality.” (OCDE, 2016)

[A school leader:] “Someone who creates the space that fosters teachers’ professional and personal development, and encourages students’ personal growth, creativity, and their own journey of discovery.” (Saavedra, J. 2017)

The role of schools as communities of professional learning and development (CPLDs) and that of their leaders as enablers of the professional growth of their staff and leaders of these CPLDs are a theme that often appears in the current quest for strategies to meet the 2030 Development Goals.

It is however the case that school leaders have not necessarily been equipped, let alone trained to accomplish this new role and transform their schools into CPLDs.